The Benefits of Woodworking

What is Woodworking?

Woodworking is the known as the building or the creation of objects out of wood. You can create a lot of different objects from woodworking and these objects can be as big as gazebos or as small as wooden toys. No matter how big or small your personal project may be you will be very likely to accomplish that goal with woodworking. In addition, woodworking has many personal as well as emotional benefits! In this article I am going to briefly identify some of these benefits for you.

Woodworking as a Career:

A lot of people who love to work with their hands have turned that love into a career through woodworking. People who build things out of wood are generally known as carpenters. Carpenters can work on a variety of woodworking projects and job types. For instance, some carpenters own their carpentry business and these individuals have the luxury to set their work hours. This benefit allows carpenters the opportunity to spend more time with their families and have less job stress. Raising children is a really difficult task no matter what way you approach the task! For a carpenter who owns his or her own business, this task might not be as hard because that individual will have more time to be a part of his or her child's life. By playing a bigger role in the life of your child you will be having a greater impact on the type of character that child develops into, which is a huge concern for any loving parent. In addition to these benefits, carpentry can also have health benefits as well.

Physical Health Benefits of Woodworking:

Woodworking requires working with and carrying wood around a lot. This results in more physical activity, which results in better physical health. Keeping your body physically fit is really important and can help prevent the occurrence of various illnesses later on in life. By being physically fit you can reduce chances that you will have a heart attack, have seizures, become a diabetic, and reduce the chances of having a number of other illnesses.

Do It Yourself Woodworking Saves Money:

I always feel like I paid way too much when I go to home improvement stores and buy patio furniture, and I am sure that I am not the only person who has felt this way! A successful business owner once told me to always increase the sales price of a product to double what you obtained it for. This way, you can always reduce the product to 50 percent off and still come out without acquiring any losses. This seems like it might be the same tactic that home improvement stores use in selling their wooden furniture products. Regardless, there is a way that you can get around paying the extra money and that has to do with building it yourself. Luckily, there are several really good woodworking products that offer thousands of detailed woodworking plans for hundreds of different project types. So, you can really build anything you want or see in any home improvement store. Doing something yourself does take a little bit of time but the time is well spent when you end up saving hundreds of dollars as a result of your hard work.

Source by Ryan Thomas P

Woodworking – Creative, Relaxing and Timeless

The title reflect Woodworking as a hobby, not as a vocation. Vocational woodworking is pretty much the opposite of the adjectives in the title because of the intense pressure to produce quickly in order to make it pay the bills. So we'll stick with the hobby orientation for purposes of this article.

Many people start a project with very little thought. This is okay if you are working from plans, material lists and cutting lists in a woodworking magazine, but when you strike out on your own, this lack of planning often results in a project that becomes very difficult to manage somewhere in the middle, when more wood needs to be added, or, more often, the final piece has to shrink just a little to make do. The project gets less fun as measurement adjustments keep being made to the original plan to keep the modified parts fitting with each other. It's kind of like playing chess with a saw, anticipating three moves ahead what the measurements are going to have to be because of the one deviation you made three steps ago.

What I would like to accomplish here is to lay out a sequence of events that need to take place as you migrate from the canned projects in the woodworking books and magazines to your own project planning.

Recreational woodworking starts with an idea of ​​something functional (a shelf, a table, a bench, a box, a desk) or something meaningful (a toy, a piece of art, a frame), or a combination of the two. This idea can be born of inspiration from looking through woodworking magazines, seeing something in a model home, or a need that exists in your own home.

Most often the concept is sketched out. Traditionally, this is done on the back of an envelope or a partially used napkin, so be sure to have some of those lying around. Once you have the sketch, you have to decide how big you want this thing to be. Often, this is determined by available space or intended function. Staying true to our adage, "measure twice, cut once", a rough dimensioned drawing is created. If this is to be a functional piece (desk, cabinet, etc.), be sure to stay reasonably close to standard measurements for desk heights, knee-hole allowances, kick spaces, cabinet heights, rail and stile widths, file drawer dimensions, etc. You'll be glad you did.

By now, the concept has evolved enough that the desired finish (paint, stain, varnish, oil) has been narrowed down, and a type of wood has been selected that is appropriate for the project, budget and finish. With so many choices of wood and finish conveniently available today, this can be quite an exercise.

Now that the type of wood and finish have been determined, it is time to decide what kinds of joints you are going to make (assuming you are not making a boomerang or hollowed-out canoe or some other one-piece thing). Considerations are strength, the look you are trying to achieve, your equipment and capabilities, and the amount of time you can invest. This can be one of the more strenuous mental exercises because of the range of choices. The look of a bung or button, the clean lines of hidden biscuit or dowel joints, the strength and intricacy of the dovetail, the simplicity of nails and glue. All have their place, and you have to decide.

Along with the joints, hardware has to be planned. Based on the hardware, you have to adjust your dimensioned drawing to accommodate clearances for drawer rails, those extra half inches for lap and dado joints, hidden hinge overlaps, insert depths for frame-and-panel door panels, etc. You also have to consider depth of relieves and radii of router profiles to make sure your stock is thick enough to allow your concept to mature as planned.

A final dimensioned drawing is created, allowing for all joint and hardware considerations, and a cutting list is prepared from this drawing. Note: This drawing does not have to be to scale, or look professional in any way. It helps the visualization process if it is proportional, but the real important aspect of this drawing is documenting the measurements. Don't be concerned about the appearance of the drawing – that is not what you will be displaying.

Now, finally, we can go to our lumber supplier and select the actual wood we will be working with. This is not where you want to save time. For the parts of the project that will show, especially for projects where the natural wood is intended to be a design feature, extra care should be taken to select the grains and natural attributes that will best fit your concept. If you are saving money intending to plane "three-sides-good" lumber, make sure the width runs far enough on the pieces selected with enough margin to get the length needed for each piece AFTER PLANING. Measure the finished surface to the beginning of the raw edge. For framework, cleats and carcasses look for straight, unknotted pieces. Warps and twists can be overcome, but they make the whole project less fun.

With this level of preparation and with sharp tools, the project will proceed nicely and the finished piece will bring you satisfaction, many years of service, and can sometimes even become a treasured family heirloom. Note: The heirloom status is often true of a desk, a well-made toy or a rocking chair. Don't set your expectations too high for laundry shelves.

Source by Kent Walters

Three Important Woodworking Tips

Tip # 1

The key to woodworking is to have the correct tools and the ability to use them. If you are a first-timer at building something out of wood, I would suggest two things. First, pick a project that is relatively small and simple. Know and understand the techniques you will use and see if there are jigs that need to be made before beginning the project. By doing this, you get a feel for your tools, plus you gain some very important experience. Second, read the instructions to your tools very carefully, and practice a time or two on some scrap wood. After over 35 years of working with wood and using woodworking tools, experience seems to be one of the most important aspects of building something you and others will be satisfied with and happy to show others.

Tip # 2

Whether you are an experienced woodworker or a beginner it is always important to study and understand the plans of your project. Be certain you have the necessary tools to be able to complete the project. For example, if you need a router, check to see if you will also need a router table or some other attachments to the router. And most importantly, check and make sure you have the correct router bits. Next, be sure you have mastered the techniques you are using to build your project. Plus, be sure you have access to all the correct tools to complete your project. Remember to always be safe when using any and all power tools and by all means read the instruction guide for information on safety.

Tip # 3

To ensure quality finished products – be certain your tools have been maintained and are running properly and all cutting surfaces are sharp and clean of any debris. Maintaining your shop and your tools is vital to creating valuable products and having an enjoyable time while following the steps to your woodworking plans. Often times your woodworking plans may not be clear to you. In cases like this you should read through the plans thoroughly and make notes on the plans where items are not as clear as they ought to be. Another important issue when working with wood is knowing the types of wood that are available and knowing whether you need a hard wood or a soft wood for your project. Whether you need a hard wood or soft wood – it is still very important to choose the correct one for your project. Choosing the wrong wood could mean the difference between keeping your finished project in the living room or in the garage.

Source by Roger Fellows

Three Ways to Get Into Woodworking

If you have some free time on your hands, or you have a few projects around the house that you want to complete, you may be thinking about getting into woodworking. It is a great hobby, and it is one that you can enjoy even if you do not have any previous experience. The fact is that wood project plans are not hard to find online, with many sites offering detailed plans that include step-by-step guides and lists of the items you will need. But how can you go from never having worked with wood to making this your hobby? Here is the three-step process.

1. Getting the Basics

Before you go deep into researching woodworking plans, we would recommend that you get the basics. Make sure you have decent tools for measuring, such as tape measures, carpenter’s pencils, combination squares and more. You will also want to get the tools that you will need to cut wood, such as jigsaws, handheld circular saws and handheld back saws. You only need to get one of each, and you do not need to get the expensive power tools. You can do this on your own, without any need for electric saws.

2. Understanding how Wood Joinery Works

Aside from learning how you are going to cut up wood and reshape it, you must also understand how wood pieces go together. That will help you as you are developing simple and complex projects. Start with a glued or screwed butt joint, as that is one of the most basic ways that you would attach wood pieces to each other. You may also want to experiment with things like glued joints to see how they can be useful.

3. Find a Top Site for Woodworking Plans

There is no doubt that you can become a woodworking hobbyist on your own, but using sites where you can browse through and identify woodworking plans is so useful. These sites will show you different wooden objects, and then demonstrate how they are made. There will be visual and written guides, and you will see a list of the items that you will need.

Going with woodworking plans is a useful start, because it will eliminate beginner errors. When you are getting started with woodworking, going with a guide is so helpful. You are just following steps, like completing any task. You are not having to think on the fly or adjust based on how something turns out. You are just following the steps, and you will end up with something that looks incredibly like the product being shown on the site.

Do not think that woodworking is a hobby that will be too difficult for you. We promise that so long as you take things slowly, and you do not try and create some overly complex structure as your first project, you will have a blast. You will begin to understand how you can manipulate wood with different saws, and then you will see how those pieces that you are cutting can join together.

Source by Edmund Brunetti

The 5-Minute Rule for Woodworking

Type of Woodworking

Before beginning any DIY undertaking, it's a very good habit to consider what tools and materials you'll need. Easy plans are going to have a list of the equipment and tools necessary to finish the task. You have to learn how to take care of hand tools before you begin using heavier tools. As you become more advanced there's a third point which you should consider and that's the woodworking project itself. Not only must you to make sure that you've got the tools necessary to do the undertaking, but additionally need to be sure that the plans do not utilize a highly specialized tool you do not possess, and the possibilities that you won't ever use them again are usually slim. Before you begin your project, it's necessary for you to realize that safety is of extreme importance.

Should you be a seasoned woodworker, it's possible that you already have much of the equipment needed. In general, there is absolutely no doubt that my woodworking package at the bottom of this article is quite a comprehensive and in depth woodworking package that accompanies a great quantity of solutions for any type of woodworking project you might think about. Many plans are free and provide pieces that are designed better than many of the paid versions that are out there.

Understanding Woodworking

Your garden shed will turn into the place to store these things so don't forget to leave adequate space. Round tables are perfect for homes with kids and pets, since you don't need to be concerned about sharp corners hurting anybody. Furniture is created from a number of woods and is contingent on the essence of the furniture piece.

Building a little backyard patio utilizing simple patio design ideas is a lot easier than you might imagine. To this effect you're going to need a decent set of table plans. So if you get started renovating furniture, the good patio design plans becomes top priority.

The Basics of Woodworking

There are two major points that you could use whenever choosing wood for your undertaking.

1. Should You Choose Softwood
2. Should You Choose Hardwood

Although it is true that making a bed from wood isn't an effortless job it is still considered by the majority of woodworkers as an important task that set a historical trend in making future woodworking projects. Plenty of homemade furniture today employs Softwood like plastics, acrylic and other similar synthetic materials. The hardwood bed project has not evolved much and continues to be a very important task.

Here's What I Know About Woodworking

Look at the tools you're likely to use and figure out the best method to use them. Whether you're someone who wishes to redecorate your individual garden or a newbie in making a project utilizing outdoor furniture, the resource at the bottom holds a wide range of books, videos, and free tips that will certainly help you realize that objective. It's a functional woodworking tool that will be a great deal of fun! Making wood has never been so exciting and that will surely garner you plenty of information for your woodworking endeavors.

Source by Cacey Larry Taylor

Starting Your First Woodworking Shop

Woodworking as a hobby can be one of the most rewarding experiences you will ever enjoy. You can get started on a shoestring with a minimal amount of tools and equipment. A small home workshop can produce a wide array of simple projects that will help you develop your creative and building skills while rewarding you with practical and artistic wood products that you can enjoy and even give away to friends and family.

WHERE TO DO YOUR WOODWORKING

Before we get into the equipment you should start with, let's talk about where you'll do your woodworking. Depending on the size of your home, you may be able to create a dedicated space to your woodworking activities. This might be a reserved spot in your garage or in your basement. In some cases, a detached shed or outbuilding may be ideal to set up your first shop. A heated shop detached from your home offers one distinct advantage: better dust control. Without sophisticated dust control systems, basement workshops will inevitably produce dust that travels into the living area of ​​your home. This is particularly true in homes with forced air heating systems where cold air returns located in the basement draw up dust into the upper levels of the house. Another advantage of detached workshops is of course the noise level. You can work without disturbing the rest of the family. A good compromise might be the garage of your home. This can help minimize the problems of dust and noise, however depending on where you live, a garage workshop may not be practical during extremes of cold or hot weather.

YOUR WOODWORKING SETUP

Space is always a challenge for the woodworker. Regardless of where you are in your development, everyone from beginner to expert all wish they add more space to work in. If you can have a dedicated spot for a workshop all the better. Floor tools and bench top equipment can remain in place from project to project. If this setup is not impossible, at least try to create a bench area where equipment can be stored and pulled out as needed. If possible plan for inevitable expansion as you acquire more tools and equipment. At the start, set up a bench area where you can store and use most of your equipment, with temporary expansion of your activities onto the garage or basement floor.

A rudimentary workbench can be constructed from inexpensive spruce lumber ideally at least 48 to 54 inches wide and 32 inches deep. The bench should be about waist height. That will enable you to work comfortably while standing. Add a sturdy shelf below the bench to house your hand power tools and a pegboard above the bench to hang other equipment. Install a wood working vice at one end of your bench on the front to hold small work pieces.

ACQUIRING YOUR EQUIPMENT

The scope of your start-up equipment will be largely based on your budget. Whether you've got large financial resources or you're starting on a shoestring always buy quality equipment. If you can afford it, purchase your quality tools at your local building and hardware center. If your budget is tight buy quality used tools from others through Kijiji or other local ads. There is an abundance of quality lightly used tools out there that belong to individuals who embarked on that one molding project around the house or received tools as gifts that they will never use. You can usually purchase tools for these sellers for less than half the original price and save even more money if you make a package deal for all their unused equipment. Of course, acquiring tools from private individuals will take extra time and perhaps travel expenses. Weigh out the benefits of traveling across town to save a few extra dollars on a cheap piece of equipment. The extra cost of time and travel in these situations is usually justified when purchasing large ticket items such as table saws, bandsaws or high ended tools like surface planers in the future.

For smaller acquisitions, a trip to your building center may be the best approach.

START-UP EQUIPMENT

In earlier times skilled workers worked with a minimal amount of hand equipment yet produced sophisticated and intricate pieces. Focus on developing your skills with your start-up set of tools and avoid lamenting about the equipment you wished you had.

Here is a checklist of the more useful tools you'll need to get started:

Safety Equipment: Start as expected with eye protection. Get a decent pair of safety glasses that also offer some side protection for your eyes. Purchase a quality acrylic set that will be scratch resistant. Progressive scratching of cheaper plastic pairs will eventually impair your vision and affect safety. Avoid wearing goggles in a workshop. Most impair vision and dust up quickly. You may avoid wearing them all together if you find them uncomfortable.

The next piece of critical safety equipment that you'll need involves ear protection. Ear protection is often overlooked by the novice woodworker yet is almost as critical as eye protection. Woodworking can be noisy and long-term exposure to these noise levels can affect hearing and lead to tinnitus and other hearing losses. Also, I find that wearing hearing protection combats fatigue. Most workers tire faster when exposed to high noise levels. Select effective hearing protection that you find comfortable and effective. These can include ear plugs or full ear muff protectors. I find that a quality set of ear muff protectors is perfect for hearing protection.

Lastly, wear a cap to keep the dust out of your hair. I prefer a simple ball cap with my ear muffs and eye protection. With this set up I'm protecting my eyes and my ears. I'm keeping the dust out of my hair. I'm good to go!

Power Hand Saw: Often referred to as a skil saw after the popular brand name, this can prove to be the most versatile tool in a start-up workshop. In fact, in the hands of an expert a power hand saw can be used to build an entire house. Eventually you'll want to buy a table saw, but for now a power hand saw for the woodworker on a budget enables him to do cross cuts, rip cuts and even intricate angle cuts. As mentioned earlier get a quality brand saw. Avoid cheap unknown brands. These tend to cut inaccurately and will burn out before you even start your second project. After selecting the right saw install a quality blade. Most skil saws come with a starter blade of lower quality even if they are a good saw. Keep this blade as a backup and install a quality blade with carbide teeth. Start with a hybrid blade. These have a balanced tooth count that works well with both cross cuts and ripping.

Power Jig Saw: A jig saw will add great versatility to your woodworking. Curved cutting is where the jigsaw excels. This versatile tool can not only cut curves. It's perfect for cutting holes in wood too like handle slots. Eventually you'll want to get a band saw. Bandsaws are even more versatile but a quality floor unit can be expensive. A jig saw can be a good stop gap for the novice woodworker. Purchase an assortment of blades for your jig saw that includes various lengths and teeth per inch.

Battery Powered Drill: Purchase a quality drill that runs on at least 12 volts, however 18 volts is better. Get one with a keyless chuck and if it is in your budget consider a ½ inch chuck over the standard 3/8 inch version. Down the road the ½ inch version will prove to be more versatile. Through hard lessons learned, I have found that buying quality in this case is more critical than ever. Cheaper drills tend to have very short run times and need to be recharged frequently. Their long-term battery life tends to be poor and to make things worse keyless chucks come loose and slip frequently. This is one annoyance you don't want in your workshop. Purchase an assortment of quality carbide tipped drill bits that are stored in a holder labeling each drill bit size. Make a habit of returning each drill bit to its prospective slot in the holder after each use. Lastly get a set of hard steel driver bits. Your drill can also be a versatile screwdriver, particularly if you selected an 18 volt model.

Hammer: The hammer remains as the most versatile tool in the shop, and often the most misunderstood one. By the way, the hammer is the one tool where most workshop accidents occur. Although the most frequent, hammer injuries are usually of a minor nature, varying from bruised fingers to the temporary loss of a fingernail. Hammers greatly vary in quality and price. So what's the difference between a cheap hammer and an expensive hammer? Quality hammers are precisely machined with a good solid joint between the handle and head. The good hammer is balanced, doesn't rust and features a comfortable handle. Most hammers in the high quality range offer metal or fiberglass handles. Cheaper hammers usually have wood handles with poor joints between the head and handle. The head usually comes loose and the tool becomes useless. Select a name brand quality hammer in the 16 ounce range for general work and a smaller finishing hammer for more intricate work. Avoid using large framing hammers in the workshop and any with dimpled head tips. These types of hammers are more suited for rough framing jobs and are unsuitable in the workshop.

Palm Sander: Purchase a ¼ sheet palm sander. This little power tool can handle just about any sanding requirements you have as a novice woodworker. As your woodworking skills evolve, you'll likely upgrade to a floor model disk and belt sander. However for now, the ever versatile palm sander can clean up edges, cross cuts and even limited amounts of surface area. As you embark on your first few projects you'll find that your palm sander with a little bit of effort can transform rough looking creations into virtual works of art! You can use your palm sander to sand and shape rough boards with 100 grit paper and later finish your work with 200 or 300 grit paper. Purchase an assortment of sandpaper sheets with an extra supply of 100 grit paper. You'll find this grade of paper the most versatile in your shop.

Hand Planes and Chisels: These classic tools are a must in every workshop. Although low tech in concept, these tools enable you to taper edges, flatten high spots and correct any imperfections in wood pieces. Start with a standard number 4 plane and an assortment of quality chisels varying in width from ¼ inch to 1 inch.

Clamps: Sooner or later you'll need clamps for glue-ups and just to hold down your wood pieces as you work on them. Unfortunately, good clamps are expensive and it usually takes the novice woodworker a few years to accumulate a comprehensive set of wood clamps. Start with a pair of long "pipe" clamps. Today the pipe has been replaced with long steel shafts, but the structure remains the same. Get a pair of the longest clamps that you can afford. You can contract them for smaller glue jobs and expand them to their full length for larger projects.

Shop Vice: A shop vice installed at the end of your bench is perfect for holding smaller jobs for sanding, filing and hole cutting with your jigsaw. Purchase a wood working vice with replaceable wooden clamping surfaces and avoid metal working vices with steel jaws. Woodworking vices with their wood clamping surfaces can securely hold wood pieces without marring or damaging them. Many of the better vices offer quick release mechanisms that enabled the user to rapidly open and close the jaws without tedious handle turning. The wood clamping surfaces in your vice will periodically need replacement. I prefer to use soft pine in my vices that will not crush or damage many of the different woods that I work with. Whether I'm working in soft pine or hard oak, soft wood clamping surfaces work the best.

Tape Measure and Marking Device: In your workshop, the ever humble tape measure will be one of your most frequently used tools. Purchase a good quality name brand tape measure with a wide tape usually in the 25 foot range. Although in your shop you may not be using the tape at these lengths, the larger tape measures offer more rigid tapes that won't flop around and slip off the end of boards. Measuring when you're by yourself will be a lot easier, and of course quality tape measures can last for many years. When marking projects, I prefer a sharp good old-fashioned HB pencil. An HB pencil will produce a nice mark without scratching the wood. Harder pencils like 2B's can scratch soft woods and will require extra sanding. Avoid oversized carpenter's pencils. Their large flat leads are just too coarse for accurate measurement in the workshop.

Other Tool and Materials: Here are a few other handy tools to round out your starter workshop: Purchase a T-square, set square and speed square. These inexpensive tools will help you in marking right angles as well as compound angles. Also, get an assortment of flat, Robertson and Philips screwdrivers. Get the number two and three Robertson set. I find that the Robertson format works best for most woodworking projects and is the most compatible with drill powered bits. Lastly get a pair of 12 inch wood files. Get a flat one and a round edged one. You'll find them perfect for rough shaping and fixing little mistakes along the way.

Adhesives: Not all glues are created equal. Avoid cheap house brands sold as carpenter's glue. The cost of glue through all of your projects is a minor cost consideration. Therefore, it makes sense to go with the best. I have also found over the years that I get the best results with both indoor and outdoor projects when I use a quality outdoor grade glue. These resin-based compounds unlike traditional water-based wood glue, will not break down and fail with moisture.

CONCLUSION

The peaceful gratification of woodworking is a wonderful experience in this day and age of rushed lives, smart phones and time starved careers. With a minimal investment in the most rudimentary tools and equipment, anyone can learn the rewarding skills of his time-tested hobby and enjoy project after project!

Source by Ron Pawlowski

Woodworking Beginners: Introduction To First Time Crafts

Woodworking: The Process Of Making Something Using Wood

The art of woodworking is one of the most ancient and widespread. From the earliest days when humans first experimented with the many uses for wood, our civilization has had a connection with this material, in all its varieties and forms. And the growth and advancement of mankind has been closely intertwined with our ability to improve our woodworking skills and to develop new uses for wood.

Primitive civilizations used wood as material for building shelters, tools, weapons, utensils, and other items necessary for survival. As time went on, they began to expand the use of wood to include the creation of creature comforts such as furniture and decorative items. They also built boats and rafts for exploration, travel and trade.

As skills and knowledge continued to develop, and woodworkers began to understand the wide variety of properties of woods from different tree sources, wood became one of the most widely used materials, found in nearly all areas of life, from home to work, production to pleasure. Those who had a talent for working wood became important artisans and craftsmen, and guilds and workshops were developed to help document and preserve the art, train apprentices, and represent the interests of those involved.

Different specialties within woodworking began to develop, each with their own tools, projects, and techniques. These categories included:

  • Wheelwright – A person who makes wooden wheels and spokes.
  • Cooper – A person who makes barrels and related goods.
  • Turning – Using a lathe and cutting tools to create symmetrical, round or curved pieces such as table and chair legs, pedestals, and candlesticks. Some wood turners, called bodgers, focused specifically on making bowls, cups, and other household utensils.
  • Carving – generally refers to any woodworking project that involves removing pieces of the original wood to create a finished product.
  • Carpenter – historically a wagon maker but over time the term has come to be associated with woodworking in general and more specifically with home and commercial construction.
  • Cabinetmaker – Someone who specializes in making cabinets, shelving, and some pieces of furniture, such as chests, curious and other storage items.
  • Shipwright – professional shipbuilder, often assisted by craftsmen from other areas of woodworking.
  • Parquetry and Marquetry – Creating beautiful and often complex patterns with different wood veneers. Originally used as decoration on furniture and some homes, but now has expanded to include artwork and picture making. Parquetry typically involves the use of geometric shapes, while Marquetry draws from life images and scenery.

Today, some of these categories have become obsolete as steel, plastic, cement, and other compounds have replaced wood in many situations. While wood is still used in numerous important applications, including home and commercial construction and furniture making, woodworking has become an activity practiced less for necessity and more for pleasure, challenge, satisfaction, and honor.

For some, woodworking is still a means of making a living, but for many, it is a fun and rewarding hobby. In addition, the tools, techniques, and applications have become more advanced and sophisticated. A person just getting started in woodworking could soon become overwhelmed with the amazing number of choices.

Most experienced woodworkers would agree that the art is still a progressive experience, taking many years to learn and advance in skill-level. The knowledge needed to create a stunning and functional chest of drawers, grandfather clock, desk or other fine piece of furniture for example, takes time and practice to develop. And the skills needed often overlap the different areas of specialization in woodworking.

Not knowing where to start or how to focus their interests, many people new to woodworking become discouraged and frustrated and soon give up. In addition, taking on projects that are too difficult or trying to work with inadequate tools can also lead beginners to decide that woodworking is not for them.

Luckily, tips and ideas from expert woodworkers can help those new to woodworking get off on the right foot. In an effort to provide a comprehensive overview of woodworking we have done the work, traveled and talked to experts in their fields, and grilled them over their secrets, their challenges, all their experiences, and their key advice for beginners. Those interviewed include fine furniture makers, master carvers, seasoned shop teachers, and several other skilled craftsmen who have been working with wood for decades.

One of the most common suggestions given was to start with the basics of general woodworking and the use of common tools used, and to avoid getting too complicated too fast. There was strong emphasis on building a solid knowledge of different woods, using key hand tools, starting with simple projects to develop key skills, and learn about safety.

As one expert toy maker, shared, "Getting a good working knowledge of woods and basic hand tools is the best thing a beginner can do to ensure future success. You need to know what type of wood works best for different projects, and if you know how to measure, cut, shape and join with hand tools, you'll be much better at it when it comes to using power tools and woodworking machines. "

Taking the experts' advice, comments, and tips to heart we explored those beginning, foundation skills in a manner that is easy to understand and does not intimidate beginners. You will learn about:

  • common woodworking terms
  • the traits and uses of some of the most popular types of wood
  • general woodworking safety
  • different types of hand tools and their proper use and care
  • basic types of projects for beginners
  • introduction to woodcarving and the tools needed

Also provided is a resources list with details on different publications, websites, and other sources of information for beginning woodworkers.

It is important to note that the field is filled with talented and skilled craftsman of both genders. Women are active in all aspects of woodworking and have established reputations for quality work. We spoke with several women in gathering material and their input was an important contribution.

That is one of the beauties of woodworking; it is a field that is open to people of all ages, genders, races, backgrounds, educational levels, etc. Anyone willing to learn and to take the time to practice can become skilled.

Woodworking is a vast and interesting realm with seemingly endless applications and opportunities to learn. Enthusiasts can take their skills to many different levels and interest directions, and even make a living with their woodworking abilities. By mastering the basics and establishing a solid foundation, you take the first, and perhaps most important steps to becoming a successful woodworker.

Source by Ferhat Gul